How much does a goat cost?

How much does a goat cost to purchase? It is dependent on the situation. If you’re talking about the price of livestock, goats can range in price depending on where you live, the breed, and how big they are. 

To put it another way, the average cost of a goat is between $100 and $200, with some breeds costing significantly more than others. 

For example, Nigerian Dwarf Goats are typically priced between $400 and $500, while Kiko goats are typically priced between $200 and $300. So, how much does a goat set you back? 

The answer varies depending on factors, but these figures will give you an idea of what to expect when looking for this type of animal at a farm or pet store near you.

How much does a goat cost?

The average costs

In most cases, goats cost between $100 and $200 per goat, with some breeds costing significantly more than others. For example, a Nigerian Dwarf Goat is typically priced between $400 and $500, whereas a Kiko goat is generally priced between $200 and $300. 

The fact that these figures are only a rough average should not be overlooked, as well. The price of a goat is affected by various factors, including its location, size, and breed. 

If you’re thinking about adopting this adorable animal into your family, it’s a good idea to do some preliminary research so you’ll be prepared for what to expect! 

More importantly, it is best to visit a local farmer or pet store and inquire about what they have available to obtain an accurate price for those looking for a specific breed.

The Costs of Different breeds

Each breed is going to have different prices. For example, most breeds of goats are very cheap, but there might be some rarer ones that will cost you more because they’re harder to find, and breeders know this!

  • Angora Goat – $1300
  • Alpine Goat – $800 
  • Boer Goats – $400 
  • Kinder Goats- $300
  • Cashmere Goats – $500

The price of a goat depends on the breed and where you live. But, on average, you can expect to pay anywhere from $50-$2000 per goat. 

Of course, if you’re looking to buy a specific breed or require special accommodations, then the price will be higher. 

However, even at the high end of that range, goats are still one of the cheapest farm animals around! So if you’re thinking about adding some furry friends to your homestead, don’t forget about the humble goat!

Cost of pen

Goat pens are expensive, and various factors will determine the price. For example, a typical pen will range from $250 to $800. 

On the other hand, a custom-built goat barn or backyard fencing solution can cost upwards of $1000, depending on the size of the structure and the type of material utilized. 

To determine the cost of a fence, you must consider several factors, including your budget, whether you want to purchase new or used materials, the quality of the fence that is required (for example, whether your yard necessitates board-on-board fencing), and the type of design options you desire, such as a gate with an arch opening.

Cost of hay

Bales of hay cost $20.00 for your goat to eat daily in most states. A goat eats about a bale of hay a day as an average-sized animal. If you can get bulk discounts, this price will be lower, but most people cannot store that much hay at one time. 

Protein supplements such as soybean meal should be added when feeding high levels (.30+) of grain due to their low protein content (~12%). Many farmers use cottonseed meals with a higher protein content (~15%), but it often comes with high levels of pesticide residue. 

As always, be sure to ask your feed dealer about the safety and legality of any feed ingredient before purchasing it. This is a more expensive option, but some farmers do not have access to hay or pasture.

Cost of feed

The price of hay, straw and other feeds will vary depending on the amount of land you have available for feeding and the quality of the land you have available. In addition, some people believe that goats are browsers rather than grazers, as evidenced by their ability to survive on less than $100 worth of browse per year. 

Therefore, if you intend to keep your goat for milk, meat, or fiber production, you should expect to spend more on feed than you did on the initial purchase price tag, regardless of the breed. 

However, before you commit to adopting a new pet or livestock guardian animal, make sure to factor in all of the associated costs, including food, fencing, shelter, and veterinarian bills.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many goats should I start with?

If you are new to goat keeping, you may be wondering how many goats to start with. The answer depends on your goals for raising goats. One of the great things about goats is that they can serve multiple purposes. You can get a lot of milk from just a few does, or meat and fiber from a single buck and doe. A few may do, but you can quickly get five to ten goats for an average family.

How much does a goat eat per day?

Goats eat a lot of hay, so they can be expensive to maintain. They also need a lot of space, so owning a goat may not be the best idea if you live in an urban area. Aside from hay, goats love to eat shrubs, weeds and even bark from trees. Overall, owning a goat is not cheap, but the fact that they love to eat grass saves you money in the end!

Why do goats make good pets?

Goats are very intelligent and can be litter box trained. They are pretty easy to train, like dogs! They make great pets because they are often herding animals in the wild, so if you keep two or more of them together, it will seem like their natural habitat where they feel safe and comfortable. Keep one on its own, though, as other goats might bully it otherwise. Some people say that keeping a goat is like having another child, but while there’s some truth about this statement (both tend to eat things around your house), goats are lower maintenance than kids!

Takeaway

Now that you are more familiar with the costs involved in owning a goat, you should also know that owning a goat can be very profitable as well. Fodder, milk and cheese can all be sold for a profit. 

Goats also require very little in the way of care, so they make an excellent choice for those who are looking to start their own small farm. 

If you’re interested in adding a goat to your herd, do some research into the different breeds available and find one that fits your needs and budget. With a little time, effort and money you can have your very own goat herd.



Written by Brian Rucker

Brian Rucker has spent his entire life participating in essentially all things homestead. He grew up on a homestead and helped his parents do the day-to-day. Read more of Brian's articles.